Flexitarian brunch in Raval – Flax & Kale

Review of: Flax & Kale
Author:
Claudia

Reviewed by:
Rating:
3
On 07/02/2015
Last modified:28/03/2017

Summary:

Flax & Kale defines itself as a flexitarian restaurant. By general definition, flexitarians are vegetarians,  who occasionally eat meat. In this restaurant, however, you will find dishes that are 80% plant-based products and 20% oily fish.

Flexitarian brunch in Raval–Flax & Kale-Smoothies What about the name, Flax & Kale? The term “flax” represents the flowered herbaceous plant that comprises linseed, while “kale” refers to the leafy cabbage, a type of cabbage very typical in Northern Europe.
Flexitarian, flax, kale, quinoa, chia, goji, and açai are all new words to the Spanish vocabulary, and apart from sounding pleasant, they connote concrete values, but until what point is that value real? Neuromarketing will never cease to surprise me.
 
The day I tried this flexitarian brunch in Raval, I ate the “Flax & Kale’s healthy pancakes” prepared with red quinoa, soy milk, free-range eggs, vanilla, and olive oil served with a blueberry soy yogurt, fresh blueberries, and maple syrup. To drink, I had a smoothie containing orange juice, chia and the following frozen fruits: mango, pineapple, strawberries, açai and goji berries. I paid a total of 14€, and although I have to admit that all ingredients are healthy, I unfortunately did leave hungry.
 
Amongst the things I enjoyed from this restaurant are the menu descriptions which identify gluten free items, products that are raw or cooked inferior to 48 Cº, vegetarian plates, or dishes containing oily fish. The place is also very lovely, with a wide interior space filled with big plants and a bright sunlight that shines through the large windows, which is much appreciated during winter.
 
Flax & Kale’s motto consists of offering a delicious, healthy, and sustainable cuisine. The delicious and healthy part is indisputable, but I ask myself, where does sustainability carry through when many of the products used come from countries far from Spain and very few are actually organic?
 
And also, what is the deal with the unisex bathrooms? Is it a new fad?


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